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Action Needed: Restrict traps and poisons on public land

Senate Bill 286 ("NM Wildlife Protection & Public Safety Act") will be heard by the Senate Conservation Committee on Tuesday, Feb. 21st, at 8:30am in Capitol Room 311!



Restrict Outdated Traps & Dangerous Poisons on Public Lands

Senate Bill 286, sponsored by Sen. Pete Campos (D-Las Vegas) and Sen. Gay Kernan (R-Hobbs), will prohibit the use of deadly poisons and outdated leghold traps on New Mexico's public lands, unless the use meets one of several specific, narrow exemptions that allow for protection of public health, safety, and protection of important infrastructure and property. This bill will better align the management of wildlife with modern conservation practices and protect wildlife, companion animals, and citizens who enjoy our state's public lands.

Traps and poisons are not necessary to manage carnivore species to protect livestock. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that carnivores kill only 0.18% of the total U.S. cattle inventory and 4% of the sheep inventory. Many non-lethal methods—including pens, sheds, and guard animals—are effective and widely available.

Restricting traps and poisons on public land makes economic sense. The presence of dangerous traps and poisons littering New Mexico’s public lands discourages wildlife watchers from spending their time—and money—in the Land of Enchantment. According to the most recent U.S. Fish & Wildlife Survey of Wildlife-associated Recreation, each year 787,000 people specifically seek to view and photograph wildlife in New Mexico. In contrast trappers represent only a fraction of the population, with only less than approximately 2,000 individuals buying a trapping license, many from out-of-state who cash in on wildlife pelts used in the fashion industry at the expense of wildlife and public safety. Promoting wildlife-watching in New Mexico is far more beneficial to our state's economy than promoting trapping.



Take action below to urge the Senate Conservation Committee to VOTE YES on Senate Bill 286!

*This form will only work for legislators who sit on the Senate Conservation Commitee. If your State Senator does not sit on this committee but you'd like to call them about SB 286 right away, please find their phone number here. Thank you for speaking out!



IMPORTANT: The more you personalize your letter, the more effective it will be in reaching and persuading your legislator. We’ve provided a draft letter for you, but we STRONGLY encourage you to edit the content of the form letter to put it in your own words. Tell a brief story about why this issue is personally important to you, and emphasize the facts that you think will resonate most with your legislator.

  • Include a personal story about interactions you or your family have had with traps or poisons on public lands

  • Share your reactions to seeing pictures and stories about traps or poisons on public land


And use the arguments that you believe will resonate best with your particular Senator:

- Traps and poisons are not necessary to manage carnivore species to protect livestock. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that carnivores kill only 0.18% of the total U.S. cattle inventory and 4% of the sheep inventory. Many non-lethal methods—including pens, sheds, and guard animals—are effective and widely available.

- Restricting traps and poisons on public land makes economic sense. The presence of dangerous traps and poisons littering New Mexico’s public lands discourages wildlife watchers from spending their time—and money—in the Land of Enchantment.

- According to the most recent U.S. Fish & Wildlife Survey of Wildlife-associated Recreation, each year 787,000 people specifically seek to view and photograph wildlife in New Mexico. In contrast trappers represent only a fraction of the population, with only less than approximately 2,000 individuals buying a trapping license, many from out-of-state who cash in on wildlife pelts used in the fashion industry at the expense of wildlife and public safety. Promoting wildlife-watching in New Mexico is far more beneficial to our state's economy than promoting trapping.